June 26, 2022

Image credit: BBC

More than 200 half-term flights from Gatwick will be cancelled by EasyJet

Over the next ten days, EasyJet will cancel more than 200 flights, causing delays for families planning to travel overseas for the half-term vacation.

Between May 28 and June 6, the airline stated roughly 24 flights a day from London’s Gatwick airport would be cancelled. The cancellations were required, according to the company, “to guarantee trustworthy services during this busy period.”

Meanwhile, people are being asked to verify the most up-to-date information before travelling to the Dover port.

According to the Dover Kent Resilience Forum, around 750 lorries were queued on Saturday morning, while tourists were given priority.

Hundreds of people have queued at London’s St Pancras station in the hope of getting to France.

The Independent’s travel editor, Simon Calder, claimed he had never seen such a huge line at the station but that there had been no major interruptions.

He claimed that families on their way to Disneyland Paris and football enthusiasts travelling to Paris for the Champions League final were among those queuing at the station. EasyJet had to cancel nearly 200 flights on Thursday due to a software malfunction.

According to the airline, it will continue to operate roughly 1,700 flights each day over the next week.

On Saturday morning, Tui Holidays cancelled six flights from Birmingham, Manchester, and London Gatwick, while additional flights were delayed.

Those whose flights were cancelled would be contacted individually and get a full refund within 14 days, according to the statement.

On Saturday alone, Gatwick Airport expects 700 planes and 110,000 people. Meanwhile, the RAC, a motoring organisation, has warned of road congestion, estimating that 17.8 million leisure trips will be taken between Friday and Sunday. The busiest day is predicted to be Saturday.

Following the relaxation of COVID restrictions on international travel, passengers have experienced delays and cancellations at airports in recent months.

Thousands of jobs were lost in the travel industry during the epidemic, but as demand for flights has increased, the business has struggled to attract people, conduct security checks, and promptly educate new workers.